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Facts and Myths

Disposable Lunch Facts - Items Carried in Work and School LunchesShare

Disposable Lunch Facts - Items Carried in Work and School Lunches
In 2009, the United States generated 13 million tons of plastics waste from containers and packaging, and 7 million tons of nondurable plastic waste (for example plates and cups). The combined total of nondurable disposables exceeded the 11 million tons of plastic durable goods, such as appliances [EPA]. Only 7 percent was recovered for recycling.More...

Reusables vs. Disposables - A Summary of Facts and SolutionsShare

Reusables vs. Disposables - A Summary of Facts and Solutions
The solution is not a plastic bag ban. This is an emotional response which fails to strike at the heart of the issue; instead of a market-based solution, a ban shifts production to paper bags and compostable bags, both of which have heavy environmental consequences.More...

Use-and-Toss Plastic Bottle FactsShare

Use-and-Toss Plastic Bottle Facts
  • 2,480,000 tons of plastic bottles and jars were thrown away in one year (2008).
  • Tap water is cleaner, cheaper and healthier than store-bought water.
  • 60 billion single-use drink containers were purchased in 2006, and 3 out of 4 were thrown out directly after use.
  • Plastic bottles are among the most prevalent source of pollution found on our beaches.
  • Plastic trash absorbs pre-existing organic pollutants like BPA and PCBs.
More...

Facts about the Impact of Household Waste on the EnvironmentShare

Facts about the Impact of Household Waste on the Environment
  • Many traditional household cleaning products are environmentally-harmful or toxic to humans.
  • 3,460,000 tons of tissues and paper towels wound up in landfills in 2008.
More...

Facts About the Plastic Bag PandemicShare

Facts About the Plastic Bag Pandemic
Over 1 trillion plastic bags are used every year worldwide. Consider China, a country of 1.3 billion, which consumes 3 billion plastic bags daily, according to China Trade News.More...

Learn About Global Efforts to Reduce Waste from Disposable ProductsShare

Learn About Global Efforts to Reduce Waste from Disposable Products
We first started tracking the plastic bag issue in 2002, reporting on Ireland’s PlasTax and various other bag bans and taxes worldwide. While most of the efforts we covered were government-led, there were also significant grassroots movements building to control the bag beast we've created over the past 25 years. Here’s a look back at our coverage of this issue over the years, a snapshot of the formation of the early years of the movement from 2003-2007.More...

Impact of Plastic Waste on Oceans, Beaches and the EnvironmentShare

Impact of Plastic Waste on Oceans, Beaches and the Environment
Want to know how bad plastic litter is getting in our oceans? This article provides a "snapshot" of the harmful effects. Please read it and forward on to others. For more information, visit Plastic in Our Oceans in our Newsroom.More...

The PlasTax - Ireland's Plastic Bag FeeShare

The PlasTax - Ireland's Plastic Bag Fee
In March of 2002, Republic of Ireland became the first country to introduce a plastic bag fee, or PlasTax. Designed to rein in their rampant consumption of 1.2 billion plastic shopping bags per year, the tax resulted in a 90% drop in consumption, and approximately 1 billion fewer bags were consumed annually. To complete the win-win scenario, approximately $9.6 million was raised from the tax in the first year, which is earmarked for a green fund established to benefit the environment. Several other countries and cities around the world are now considering implementing a similar tax, including UK, Australia and New York City.More...

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